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Zali Steggall presents draft law to combat misleading political advertising | The Canberra times

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News, federal politics, Zali Steggall, advertising, misinformation, elections, Clive Palmer

Political actors who make misleading or fraudulent statements in election materials are instructed to quickly correct the balance sheet under the proposed laws in an attempt to “stop the lies” that undermine public confidence in Australian democracy. The independent MP Zali Steggall has presented a bill for private members to eradicate lies and misinformation in the federal election campaign. The Warringah MP’s proposal would specifically target the use of “deep fake” videos, amid fears that emerging technology could be used as a weapon to mislead voters. The “Stop the Lies” bill, based on the laws already in place in ACT and SA, responds to the “amount of misleading and fraudulent advertising” that plagued recent federal election campaigns. Recent prominent examples include Labor’s so-called “Mediscare” campaign in 2016, the “death tax” social media deterrent campaign, and the Liberal Party’s use of Chinese language whistle flutes, which are like the signs the Australian Electoral Commission should look like in the last general election. Ms. Steggall said it was “perfectly legal” to lie in a political advertisement under existing Australian law. “Public confidence in politicians has eroded over time, part of that erosion being due to their propensity to lie and lack of accountability,” she said. “There are laws in place to prevent misleading and misleading advertising by companies, and there are enforcement agencies to keep an eye on this. But there is no law or agency preventing politicians or anyone else from lying about a candidate or his opponent during an election. “Campaign.” The proposed changes to Commonwealth electoral laws would prohibit advertising material containing misleading or misleading statements. It would specifically prohibit politicians, candidates or activists from impersonating anyone else, including through the use of “deep fake” videos, which use artificial intelligence to recreate and imitate a person’s physical appearance or voice Australian Electoral Commission would have the power to order the offending person or party to stop publishing the material, withdraw the statement or correct the records. READ MORE Ms. Steggall urged the major parties to support her proposal, if not for the sake of democracy, then you are protected from misinformation attacks Protect prominent political actors from third parties. Labor’s party platform already includes an obligation to introduce truth into political advertising laws if it wins the government. A 2019 study by the progressive think tank The Australian Institute found that 84 percent of Australians support laws to combat misleading political advertising. SA was the first jurisdiction to pass the truth in political advertising laws, and the ACT followed late last year. The ACT’s laws went into effect July 1, but will not be tested until the next area elections in 2024. ACT Election Commissioner Damian Cantwell had urged the government to postpone the implementation of the new regime amid concerns that his office could be considered politically partisan if asked to investigate complaints. Ms. Steggall said the electoral commission’s inherent independence means it is the appropriate authority for the role. She hoped to be able to submit the bill to parliament in October.

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Political actors who make misleading or fraudulent statements in election materials are instructed to quickly correct the balance sheet under the proposed laws in an attempt to “stop the lies” that undermine public confidence in Australian democracy.

The independent MP Zali Steggall has presented a bill for private members to eradicate lies and misinformation in the federal election campaign.

The Warringah MP’s proposal would specifically target the use of “deep fake” videos, amid fears that emerging technology could be used as a weapon to mislead voters.

The “Stop the Lies” bill, based on the laws already in place in ACT and SA, responds to the “amount of misleading and fraudulent advertising” that plagued recent federal election campaigns.

Recent prominent examples include Labor’s so-called “Mediscare” campaign in 2016, the “death tax” social media deterrent campaign, and the Liberal Party’s use of Chinese language whistle flutes, which are like the signs the Australian Electoral Commission should look like in the last general election.

Ms. Steggall said it was “perfectly legal” to lie in a political advertisement under existing Australian law.

“Public confidence in politicians has eroded over time, part of that erosion being due to their propensity to lie and lack of accountability,” she said.

“There are laws in place to prevent misleading and misleading advertising by companies, and there are enforcement agencies to keep an eye on this. But there is no law or agency that prevents politicians or third parties from lying about a candidate or his opponent during an election. “Campaign.”

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In the 2019 federal election campaign, signs were placed in the ACT with references to a “death tax”. Image: Delivered

The proposed changes to Commonwealth election laws would prohibit advertising material that contains misleading or misleading statements.

It would expressly forbid politicians, candidates or activists from impersonating any other person, including through the use of “deep fake” videos. The videos use artificial intelligence to recreate and imitate a person’s physical appearance or voice.

The Australian Electoral Commission would have the power to order the offending person or party to stop publishing the material, withdraw the statement or correct the record.

Ms. Steggall called on the major parties to support her proposal, if not for the sake of democracy, then to protect themselves against misinformation attacks by prominent third parties.

SA was the first jurisdiction to pass the truth in political advertising laws, and the ACT followed late last year.

The ACT’s laws went into effect July 1, but will not be tested until the next area elections in 2024.

Ms. Steggall said the electoral commission’s inherent independence means it is the appropriate authority for the role.

She hoped to be able to submit the bill to parliament in October.

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